PHENOMENAL CUSTOMER SERVICE

How to Create Moments of Magic that Turn Ordinary Interactions into Memorable Experiences
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KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • CREATING MOMENTS OF MAGIC VS. MOMENTS OF MISERY
  • SETTING EXPECTATIONS & EXCEEDING THEM AT EVERY TURN
  • THE AWESOME POWER OF ASKING THE EXTRA QUESTION
  • HOW TO ADD LITTLE EXTRAS THAT MAKE THE BIG DIFFERENCE
  • WHY QUALITY, CONSISTENCY, AND EXPERTISE ARE SO IMPORTANT

ABOUT THE SEMINAR

In today’s highly competitive marketplace, ordinary interactions will only get you so far. In order to create long-term, secure relationships with your clients and customers, you need to amaze them. In this thoroughly engaging, high content seminar, you’ll learn how to make a great first impression, build rapport, communicate more effectively, exceed expectations, avoid moments of misery and much more. While you’re learning these practical strategies, you’ll be totally entertained with Shep Hyken’s astonishing magic. His philosophy is, “moments of magic don’t just happen, they’re created by people who know the formula.”

Shep Hyken, is a New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-selling business author who has been entertaining and educating audiences around the world for more than 25 years. As the author of Moments of Magic, The Loyal Customer, The Cult of the Customer and The Amazement Revolution, Shep Hyken knows what it takes to turn ordinary interactions into memorable experiences. As a speaker, he has worked with hundreds of clients ranging from Fortune 100 organizations to international associations. Furthermore, he has been inducted into the National Speakers Association Hall of Fame, and is recipient of the CSP designation for speaking excellence. Discover for yourself why Shep Hyken consistently amazes his audiences.

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PHENOMENAL CUSTOMER SERVICE

Satisfactory isn’t good enough. Any moment of truth that’s in the middle or average is simply a moment of mediocrity in my mind. The goal is to create magic, moments of magic. Now, I talk about creating customer amazement and creating magic, and people think, oh, we’ve got to blow people away, go over the top with our service. No, you don’t have to. The best companies in the world sometimes blow you away with amazing, over the top, wow level of service. However, the best ones are always consistently better than average, and that is the key. If you want to create moments of magic, if you want to create customer amazement, simply be better than average all of the time. Now, back to this moments of truth concept… What is the average age of a person working at McDonald’s, 16, 18? But they’re teenagers. When they’re handing you your food, what do you think; what’s your impression that some of these teenagers are thinking about as they hand you your food? Are they thinking about you? No. No, what are they thinking about? What time do they get off. What time do they get off and what they’re going to do tonight. Actually, that’s not always true, and I’m not trying to slam McDonald’s because that is actually not true. If they hire the right people, that’s not what they’re thinking. However, if you go to many of these fast food or quick serve restaurants, you’ll find that sometimes the employees, especially the younger ones, it’s difficult to get them engaged. However, if that employee is nice to you and they smile at you and they thank you and they give you a big smile as they hand you your food and take your money, that’s a moment of magic. Many times that’s all it takes to elevate that normal, average, mundane experience to something just a little bit better. Now, on the flip side I’ll give you a great example. There was a McDonald’s on the way to school. I used to take my kids to breakfast at least once a week, and I’d say, “Where do you want to go to breakfast?” They’d go, “Let’s go to McDonald’s.” They loved the breakfast at McDonald’s. There are two McDonald’s. “Which one do you want to go to?” “Oh, we want to go to…” and they always say the same one. Why? Well, there was this one particular woman. By the way, early in the morning it’s not kids working there because they’re supposed to be in school. But this one particular woman, she was fantastic. We would walk in the McDonald’s and she would say, “Well, look who’s here. Kids, come on up here.” She was so warm and inviting. She would tell my kids, “Kids, I know exactly what you’re going to have for breakfast.” My kids would go, “What are we going to have?” She would tell them. My kids would go, “Well, how does