PRACTICAL TEAM BUILDING

How to Make Teamwork Work with Anybody, Anyplace, Anytime
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KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • DEVELOPING THE SIX SKILLS THAT ALL EFFECTIVE TEAMS USE
  • UNDERSTANDING WHAT STOPS TEAMWORK FROM WORKING
  • REWARDING TEAM CONTRIBUTION VS. INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTION
  • CREATING MORE COOPERATION AND UNITY WITHIN THE TEAM
  • CELEBRATING TEAM SUCCESS AND KEEPING THE MOMENTUM

ABOUT THE SEMINAR

Most companies have teams in place – customer service, management, sales, etc. The challenge is that many team members have never been taught effective teamwork strategies. In this practical, easy to implement training session, award-winning speaker Mark Sanborn shares key ideas and techniques for building a more cohesive, productive team. You’ll learn the five characteristics of a unified team, six skills that all effective teams use, three reasons why teamwork doesn’t work, how to instill greater cooperation, and much more. These skills are applicable to anybody, in any industry, virtually anywhere in the world. Both team members and leaders will walk away from this seminar with an easy to use framework for developing a team where everyone wins.

Mark Sanborn is an international bestselling author and noted authority on team building, leadership and customer service. Mark has served as the president of the National Speakers Association and is one of the youngest speakers ever to be inducted into the Speaker Hall of Fame. Mark has authored eight books and nearly two dozen audio and video training programs including the bestselling books The Fred Factor, You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Leader and The Encore Effect. In 2007 Mark was awarded the Ambassador of Free Enterprise Award by Sales & Marketing Executives International. His impressive list of more than 2400 clients includes Harley Davidson, Costco, ESPN, First Data and Cisco.

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PRACTICAL TEAM BUILDING

Number four, in a team there is always linkage between individual and team success. If you’re taking notes today, you can write down these four letters, TIPO. It stands for Team and Individual Performance Objectives. If you’re a team leader, link the reward that individual members receive to the success of the team. Link the rewards that individual members receive to the success of the team. That means you need two sets of objectives. The first set of objectives is the traditional workplace: Here’s what you’re responsible for and here’s what you’ll be evaluated on in terms of your personal performance. The problem is in most workplaces those are the only objectives. There needs to be a second set of objectives that says: Here are the goals for the team. You will also be evaluated on your contribution in helping the team achieve those goals. When you do that, you create that linkage that is sadly lacking in most organizations. My background is in professional… *** Think about it. Your goal as a team leader or as a team member is to create a holographic team. A holographic team is a team where every team member regardless of tenure or position or salary or background, every team member knows, understands, and is committed to the blueprint for the team’s success. Now, this is powerful stuff, and I’ll tell you why. Most teams don’t have a blueprint, much less know what it is. Most teams, if you ask people what the team is about, they have a very vague sense of what they’re supposed to be doing. They have no idea of how to tell if they’re successful, and even worse, they have no idea of figuring out when it’s over. All good teams have an ending point. All good teams know what the eventual success of the team looks like; because if people don’t know that, they lose passion and momentum over time. People always need to know, what does success look like? *** One overriding principle, and that is in my opinion the key to dealing with conflict is to confront problems, not people; to confront problems, not people. Nobody wants to be attacked. When people feel attacked, they become defensive and resistant. When people feel you are cooperating with them to solve the problem, they feel supported and helped. Every once and a while when I try to check into my hotel, the person behind the desk will tell me they do not have my reservation. They will tell me that the hotel is full. There are no rooms at the hotel. Now, my inclination is to confront the person. It would be fun just to vent and tell them how tired I am and how upset I am that I made a reservation that’s been lost and that I want a room. However, whenever I’m about to attack that person, I remember one thing. They’re the only person that can give me a key to the room.